trans-2-butene
C4H8

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General Characteristics Health Hazards Material Recommendations
A colorless, flammable and liquefied gas with detectable odor. A Simple asphyxiant Normal materials can be used for gas, avoid plastic and rubber for liquids.
TLV-TWA Flammable Limits DOT Class / Label
None Established 1.6-9.7% 2.1 / Flammable
Molecular Weight Specific Gravity Specific Volume
56.1 1.997 @ 60 F 6.7 cu.ft./lb @ 70 F
CGA Valve Outlet CAS Registry No. UN Number
510 624-64-6 1012
National Stock Number (NSN) Applicable to trans-2-Butene MIL Specs/ Fed Specs
MSDS for trans-2-Butene


Grade
Part #
Purity Minimum Cylinder
Size
Volume
Lbs.
Pressure
@ 70 F
Comments
Technical
467600
95% Min.
Liquid Phase
110
016
007
LBS
135
17
7
0.375
15
15
15
15

None


Uses: Member of the alkene group of hydrocarbons. Alkenes serve as intermediates in the preparation of a variety of organic compounds. In the industrially important Oxo process, alkenes react catalytically with carbon monoxide and hydrogen to give aldehydes. Alkenes are polymerized by heating with catalysts to give high-octane gasolines, plastics, and synthetic rubber.

Also called BUTYLENE, any of four isomeric compounds belonging to the series of olefinic hydrocarbons. The chemical formula is C4H8. The isomeric forms are 1-butene, cis-2-butene, trans-2-butene, and isobutylene. All four butenes are gases at room temperature and pressure.

Butenes are formed during the cracking (breaking down of large molecules) of petroleum to produce gasoline; they can also be prepared commercially by the catalytic dehydrogenation (elimination of hydrogen atoms from the molecule) of butanes. The major part of the butenes is utilized for the production of octanes, which are important constituents of gasoline. This is done either by causing the butenes to react with isobutane or by

dimerizing (combining two molecules of) butenes to form octenes, which, on hydrogenation (addition of hydrogen atoms to molecules), yield octanes. On treatment with water in the presence of catalysts, the butenes are transformed into secondary and tertiary butyl alcohols, which are used as commercial solvents. On dehydrogenation, normal butenes form butadiene, the principal starting material for synthetic rubber.