Ethyl Chloride
C2H5Cl
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General Characteristics Health Hazards Material Recommendations
A colorless, flammable and liquefied gas with ether-like odor. A Simple asphyxiant. Has an anesthetic effect in high concentrations. Forms toxic substances upon heating or combustion. Corrosive in moist conditions, use stainless steel. Dry gas: Normal materials can be used.
TLV-TWA Flammable Limits DOT Class / Label
1000 ppm 3.8-15.4% 2.1 / Flammable
Molecular Weight Specific Gravity Specific Volume
64.5 2.22 @ 70° F 6.0 cu.ft./lb @ 68° F
CGA Valve Outlet CAS Registry No. UN Number
510 75-00-3 1037
National Stock Number (NSN) Applicable to Ethyl Chloride MIL Specs/ Fed Specs
MSDS for Ethyl Chloride


Grade
Part #
Purity Minimum Cylinder
Size
Volume
Lbs.
Pressure
@ 70 F
Comments
Chemically Pure
404900
99.7% Min.
Liquid Phase
454
110
016
LBS
800
175
25
0.5
5.3
5.3
5.3
5.3

None


Uses: Ethyl Chloride is used industrially as a refrigerant, as an intermediate in organic synthesis, as a local anesthetic in medicine and dentistry, as a solvent for for phosphorus, sulfur, fats, oils, resins, waxes and for the manufacture of tetraethyllead and ethylcellulose.

Also called ETHYLENE DICHLORIDE, or 1,2-DICHLOROETHANE, a colourless, toxic, volatile liquid belonging to the family of organic halogen compounds and having an odour resembling that of chloroform. It was formerly important as a solvent and as a raw material for making ethylene glycol and polysulfide rubbers, but now it is principally used for making vinyl chloride and as a component of tetraethyllead anti-knock formulations for gasoline. Ethylene chloride is produced by the reaction of ethylene and chlorine; it is denser than water and practically insoluble in it. It is an effective solvent for fats, waxes, greases, and numerous other organic compounds, but its use as a solvent has been largely discontinued in favour of tetra-chloroethylene.

Ethylene chloride is converted to vinyl chloride (an important raw material for plastics) by contact with a catalyst at about 500° C (900° F) or by reaction with dilute caustic alkali at about 150° C (300° F). The use of ethylene chloride with tetraethyllead depends upon its ability to prevent the accumulation of lead compounds within the engine by converting them into lead chloride, which is sufficiently volatile to be vaporized and carried away in the exhaust gases.